Eid-ul-Fitr

by Wadsam | July 18, 2015 3:50 am

The first Eid was celebrated in 624 CE by the Prophet Muhammad with his friends and relatives after the victory of the battle of Jang-e-Badar.

 Eid-ul-Fitr is a Muslim holiday that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting.

Muslims are not only celebrating the end of fasting, but thanking Allah for the help and strength that He gave them throughout the previous month to help them practice self-control.The festival begins when the first sight of the new moon is seen in the sky.

Eid-ul-Fitr is celebrated for one, two or three days. Common greetings during this holiday are the Arabic greeting ‘Eid Mubārak (“Blessed Eid”) or ‘Eid Sa‘īd (“Happy Eid”).

The celebratory atmosphere is increased by everyone wearing best or new clothes, and decorating their homes.

Eid-ul-Fitr has a particular salat (Islamic prayer) consisting of two raka’ah (units) and generally offered in an open field or large hall.[1] It may only be performed in congregation (Jama’at) and has an additional extra six Takbirs (raising of the hands to the ears while saying “Allahu Akbar” [God is Great]), three of them in the beginning of the first raka’ah and three of them just beforeruku’ in the second raka’ah in the Hanafi school.

There are special services out of doors and in mosques, processions through the streets, and of course, a special celebratory meal – eaten during daytime, the first daytime meal Muslims will have had in a month.

Eid is also a time of forgiveness, and making amends.

EID MUBARAK TO YOU ALL!!!

Source URL: http://wadsam.com/arts-culture/eid-ul-fitr-131/